OPENNEX CLIMATE DATA ACCESS TOOL
Quickly Build and Access Custom Climate Datasets from NASA Earth Exchange Downscaled Climate Projections
BUILD
Create a custom dataset by selecting the time, region, parameter, climate model and scenario that matches your needs.
SERVE
Run the provided bash script to deploy a Docker container that will acquire and serve the data you selected.
ACCESS
Download your data in NetCDF or CSV format. You can also request data using any tool that supports the http protocol.
SHARE
Deploy your container publicly to expose the access endpoint, or share the unique dataset permalink with colleagues.
NASA EARTH EXCHANGE DATASETS
Choose from Two Downscaled Climate Projections
NEX-GDDP is comprised of downscaled climate scenarios derived from the General Circulation Model runs conducted under the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 and across two of the four Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP 4.5 / RCP 8.5) greenhouse gas concentration trajectories.
The dataset includes daily maximum temperature, minimum temperature, and precipitation from 21 models at a 0.25° (~25 km x 25 km) global resolution from 1950-2100.
NEX-DCP30 is comprised of downscaled climate scenarios derived from the General Circulation Model runs conducted under the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 and across the four Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) greenhouse gas concentration trajectories.
The dataset includes monthly averaged maximum temperature, minimum temperature, and precipitation from 33 models, as well as ensemble statistics, at a 30 arcsecond resolution spanning the conterminous United States from 1950-2100.
ABOUT THIS TOOL
Powered by Planet OS Datahub
The OpenNEX Climate Data Access Tool was produced by Planet OS in collaboration with the NASA Earth Exchange (NEX) team with the intent of improving access to data for climate assessment.
The OpenNEX project launched in November 2013 when a number of important large-scale Earth science datasets were published as Amazon S3 buckets and made freely available for researchers, students, and citizen scientists.
This project continues the work of that initial effort by providing intuitive, web-based access interfaces to the NEX-DCP30 and NEX-GDDP data. The climate access tool requires no programming knowledge and produces CSV or NetCDF files that can be used for climate science work done in languages such as Python, R, Matlab, and even Excel.
For a detailed overview of the OpenNEX Climate Data Access Tool, please consult the documentation. Example code written in R and Python is also available.
Please note that this tool has been released as a pilot version, with a preliminary set of features. If you have suggestions on how we might improve the tool, we’d love to hear your feedback. You can share your thoughts by sending an email to feedback@planetos.com.